You can check out all the quintessential New England experiences in Maine, from fresh seafood feasts to postcard-perfect historic lighthouses, but there’s much more to savor in the northeasternmost US state. Vacation cabins in Maine open up a world of possibilities in the great outdoors, whether you’re staying near Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park—the tallest peak in the North Atlantic seaboard and, for part of the year, the spot where the sun first rises in the US—or in a waterfront hideaway in the Lakes and Mountains region.

Cabin rentals in the Lakes and Mountains region

An hour away from Portland, Maine’s largest city, lies the Lakes and Mountains region. And the area’s pretty much what it sounds like—cabin rentals here offer a dizzying array of outdoor and waterfront activities, no matter what time of year you’re visiting. If you’d rather just spend your time sipping wine with your partner while enjoying the natural scenery, that’s fine, too; the beauty of renting a vacation home here is that you can fill the days with as much or as little action as you like. Go for a drive on Grafton Notch Scenic Byway or the High Peaks Scenic Byway for spectacular vistas of the mountains, or visit charming towns like the twin cities of Lewiston and Auburn, where the Great Falls Balloon Festival takes place each summer. In the winter, Lakes and Mountains getaway cabins are your ticket to thrilling days on the slopes, as Maine’s biggest ski resorts can be found in this region.

Maine Highlands vacation home rentals

The Maine Highlands are home to the 5,267-foot-high Mount Katahdin, the tallest mountain in Maine, as well as the state’s largest body of water, Moosehead Lake. Throw in 3 state parks, a part of the famed Appalachian Trail—whose Hundred-Mile Wilderness area is notable for frequent moose sightings—and a cozy cabin rental, and you’ve got the perfect recipe for an outdoorsy getaway with endless opportunities for hiking, hunting, fishing, and other escapades in nature. The vast wilderness of Baxter State Park is a prime spot for birding and wildlife viewing, while the neighboring Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument is great for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing come wintertime. For a quick urban escape, you can visit the small city of Bangor, where you can sample locally made craft beers, catch a show at the University of Maine’s Collins Center for the Arts, or take the kids to Maine Discovery Museum.

Cabins for rent in the Mid-Coast and Islands region

Charming New England coastal villages dot Maine’s Mid-Coast and Islands region, a destination that boasts breathtaking natural scenery and a vibrant culinary scene. Foodies will enjoy visiting lobster shacks and farm-to-table restaurants, or checking out food festivals like Rockland’s summertime Maine Lobster Festival and the agricultural Union Fair. Beloved beaches can be found at Reid State Park and Popham Beach State Park, 2 of the most picturesque spots in the region. Popham Beach offers a long stretch of sandy coast at low tide, and you can even walk to nearby Fox Island; just be mindful of the tide to avoid any catastrophes. Close to Boothbay Harbor, Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens features sculptures, nature trails, and landscaped gardens. Cabin rentals in the Mid-Coast provide plenty of opportunities for sailing, paddling, and swimming, as well as unique experiences like lobster hauling excursions and oyster tasting cruises.

Acadia National Park getaway cabins Image

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Acadia National Park, Maine’s sole national park, lies on Mount Desert Island in the state’s Downeast region. Various hiking trails take you up mountains, over rocky coastlines, or through lakes and forests. In winter, you can go ice fishing, cross-country skiing, and snowmobiling. From your vacation cabin near Acadia National Park, you can also visit Bar Harbor, the largest town on Mount Desert Island, for water activities like boating, fishing, and whale-watching tours. The Abbe Museum houses exhibits on the Wabanaki Indians, while the Dorr Museum of Natural History will tell you more about the regional wildlife. Stroll along West Street and you’ll see the remaining summer estates from the days when Bar Harbor was a resort for America’s wealthiest families.